Back with more seeds

I’m back and guess what? – I brought more seeds :)
We cannot remove/transport plants but, no worry they are contained within the seeds: tiny capsules of time and memories, of new places, mountains and blue skies…
A gallery with few images for now, there will be plenty of time for stories when days are getting shorter.

All available seeds, including more local collections will be added to the Shop over the next couple of weeks. Please stay tuned…

Last minute seeds collecting and away on holidays

Good news for those who pre-order, I did a last minute seeds collecting and cleaning  of Trillium grandiflorum! In case someone doesn’t notice the banner on the front page and stumbles on the blog here:

The Seeds Shop and all other activities, except seed collecting :) are suspended until August 10!

It is preferably to not place orders; if it happens, don’t worry, shipping will resume after August 10.

To quote John Muir – “The mountains are calling and I must go”. I’ll be back….

 

Friday’s Seed – Jeffersonia diphylla

During a visit to the Aspen Groves Gardens to leave a few of my ‘precious’ seedlings for babysitting, I have also been ‘presented’ with nice, fresh and fat seeds of Jeffersonia diphylla :)

The seeds don’t keep very well in moist storage and I will be trying a new method this year, but you may never know how it goes…I recommend to those who have been waiting for it, to get hold of the seeds right now (orders are accepted until July 12th, then the Shop will be closed till August 10th).

All you need to know is here: http://botanicallyinclined.org/growing-jeffersonia-from-seeds/

Jeffersonia diphylla, Twinleaf; few seeds still attached to the fruit wall.

Jeffersonia diphylla seeds – 1 mm grid

 

And btw, those living in driving distance from Guelph, Ontario – this Saturday, July 8, Aspen Grove Gardens of Robert and Judy Pavlis are open for visiting from 10 am- 4 pm.  Don’t miss the opportunity!

Read more and see pictures here: http://www.robertpavlis.com/aspen-grove-gardens/

 

Note: Besides sowing fresh or moist kept seeds, I emphasize again the requirement for good germination.

Baskin & Baskin have shown that ripe seeds of Jeffersonia diphylla have an underdeveloped embryo. Seeds need high summer temperatures (30˚C) in order for the embryo to develop optimally and reach at least one mm in length before dormancy can be broken by cold stratification. If this requirement is not met, another warm/cold cycle is required by the seeds to germinate.

Jeffersonia diphylla two-year old plant

In straight line with ‘canadensis’

A last announcement because we enter a straight line towards the celebrations – Sanguinaria canadensis and Asarum canadense freshly collected seeds are on sale (!) for a limited time and while quantities last, of course.

Need to read more about growing Sanguinaria from seeds? – read HERE.

Sanguinaria canadensis seeds

As I said, for this special occasion the celebration will last all season long! More species will be added to the list depending how well the seeds collecting goes.

This is the Canada 150 Celebration Seeds sale list for the moment – take advantage, some items are already getting low in stock ;)

Happy Canada Day!

Out in the woods

Sanguinaria capsules were not ready to collect as I thought, but  everything looks green and lush which is very good news after last year’s terrible drought. Medeola, Canada mayflower (Maianthemum canadense), Cornus rugosa and Viburnum acerifolium were flowering; Lonicera canadensis berries were beckoning in the filtered shade and Mitella seeds were ready, waiting in their little cups. About Mitella I knew because I have it in the garden ;)

Mitella diphylla – Two-leaved bishop’s mitre; combines beautifully with Uvularia (in the background), Trillium, Thalictrum dioicum, Hepatica and many other species which like part-shade locations.

It has been added on the Canada 150 Celebration list sale! 

Canada 150 Celebration Seeds Sale!

Canada is 150 years old this year!

In the spirit of celebration, I thought to join the party and kick off a festive sale before the new seed wave arrives. I wanted to wait until I collect the Sanguinaria next week but entrepreneur ;) people already noticed the new category in the shop so it’s time to let everyone know about the celebration!

If the mood strikes and I can collect enough seeds, to celebrate our diversity :) species representing other colours will be included, so stayed tuned.

Click on the image to see the list; it is a bit short for now but few interesting things out there. More species will be added when new seeds become available. Some will be on sale just for a short time while for others the party will go on all year long!

*This offer can be combined with other coupon discounts (ORGS, SRGC, vip); they will apply only for non-sale items in the cart.

Transition – Hepatica seeds added to the shop!

The Hepatica seeds were added to the shop!

Seeds of the more special forms were only enough for pre-orders and trades with friends. Taking into consideration that most often there are 1-2 specimens to collect seeds from, it is understandable. Considering that all seeds are open pollinated, we can always obtain a ‘special’ form even from the most regular H. americana seeds because they were collected from the same populations.
As well, there is no guarantee that from one of the special forms all seedlings will come true to type.

They all grow together and they are all wonderful!

The most important thing is that you don’t need to worry about germination. I even did a small experiment and went the ‘grower style’ by sowing in the cell packs ;) The first flower will appear in the third year if plants grow well.

I would like to show, again, the transition that seeds undergo during storage.  Don’t worry that after seeing the pictures of fresh green/yellowish seeds you will receive ‘black’ ones. The former is the normal transition of the outer tegument during maturation. Also, at this stage, the white elaiosomes are not visible anymore (their only function being to attract the ants who disperse the fresh seeds).

Sanguinaria, woodland poppies (Stylophorum sp.) and the gingers – soon to join the moist group!

 

 

Change the label for Mimulus!

Everyone who bought Mimulus – given as alsinoides in the shop – it flowered in my garden and it seems to be M. guttatus – my apologies.

I hope no one gets upset; after all, guttatus has these large, bright yellow flowers, and it’s a short form!

Mimulus guttatus – bad picture, it was very windy

When collecting seeds from a new region for the first time, mistakes are bound to happen (more than usual). When I collected the seeds, all I could see were a few almost faded flowers of M. alsinoides, so it is possible that both species are mixed in the seeds harvested and sent.

Life in the fast lane – first seeds of the season available!

The very first seeds of the season, fresh and moist ;) are available!

Corydalis solida in various colours (although there is no guarantee on the seedlings colour) and the beauty of the spring, Claytonia virginica.
You can obtain 100% germination with both and have nice colonies developing in your garden in no time!

Dicentra cucullaria has put on a very nice show but it disappointed, yet again, when it came to setting seeds. But, ‘rice grains’ are always available to order (shipping only in Canada) and it saves you 1 to 2 years’ worth of growth.

Take advantage of the new shipping rates, very convenient for buying just a couple of packets, or keep an eye open until late June when Sanguinaria canadensis, Stylophorum and few others will join the moist company ;)

Hepatica seeds soon to follow after the pre-orders are finalized…

 

Breaking the tradition – Medeola virginiana germination

More updates on germination requirements

It seems that Medeola virginiana seeds don’t follow the traditional double morphophysiological dormancy (MPD). Unlike most species with this type of dormancy, which require a cold-warm-cold cycle to germinate and produce roots in the warm period (2 years seeds), M. virginiana seeds do not form a root during this time; instead, root and cotyledon emerge at the same time in the second spring after sowing.

Medeola virginiana seedlings; seeds sown fall 2015 – germination spring 2017

Speculations are that this sort of germination pattern may represent a transition towards a type of more complex MPD.
Or is it sorcery involved ? ;-)

OK, the practical meaning of all this: be patient and don’t scratch the pots looking for tiny roots in the first year.

For me: I could keep the seeds in moist storage until the second spring, if I would have that many…

Note: again, we are talking here about sown fresh/moist kept seeds.