In between

In a temperate continental climate there is always a stretch of time called by those with an optimistic inclination – early spring. Surely it’s not winter anymore, and it’s not spring yet; this is the ‘in between’.

A whole plethora of plants will fast come into bloom as soon as it gets warm: snowdrops, crocuses, winter aconites (Eranthis), Cyclamen coum, some Helleborus, Corydalis solida, to name just a few. Others like Stylophorum, Corydalis nobilis, Lathyrus vernus, Hepatica, Primulas will show up wearing tight future flower buds – a tantalising promise.

The ‘in between’ can bring great joy and also even greater disappointments when very low temperatures return abruptly.

But even so, every day means one more step that helps to cross the ‘in between’ – to spring! :)

All images of yesterday (before the last night temperature of -9˚C!)

*Primula species were grown from seeds, and I eagerly await for P. elatior ssp. meyeri (a wild collection from Abkhazia) to flower!

12 replies
  1. Julie
    Julie says:

    The in-between early Spring is cold again here and forecast till the end of the month and beyond. I am an optimist by nature but its this part of the year I always really dislike. This morning I visited one of our RHS gardens and the Alpine house, woefully small but lots of colour. The rest of the gardens were pretty drab and any early flowers of ericaceous camellias ect were now frosted. Sadly some of Hepaticas had been stolen, so none were on display to the public today. But you are right, each day is one step closer to the real Spring.

    • diversifolius
      diversifolius says:

      So is the forecast here actually; maybe even more snow. I also don’t like it, especially that I kept pots in the garage that now started into growth and cannot go outside.
      I put few out in the sun and I’ll have them back in the evening, but this is not good. An Alpine house would be a good thing to have.
      I can’t believe someone would stole plants from a public garden in UK!!!

      • Julie
        Julie says:

        I was quite shocked, this was at RHS Wisley, which is in a very well to do area, the custodians thought they were stolen to be propagated. Elsewhere in the garden they have already put signs up about plant theft. Last year when we visited National Trust Cragside, there were signs up to say they had stopped labelling plants to stop theft, which as a visitor trying to identify plants, without labels is frustrating. It seems horticulture isn’t always the mild mannered activity its made out to be. I hope some sunshine and warmth is on its way for you!

        • diversifolius
          diversifolius says:

          Thank you Julie. I don’t know how this can happen in England, or maybe because it’s in England? ;) Plant-temptation is dangerous!

  2. mrsdaffodil
    mrsdaffodil says:

    It’s an exciting time of year, full of promise. We’ve had a few sunny, warm days here in Victoria and I’ve been spending a lot of time weeding. The city is full of blossoms. The forecast for tomorrow is rain. Thanks for posting these lovely photos!

    • diversifolius
      diversifolius says:

      Well, we still have quite a bit until to see the city full of blossoms here. Few species are dangerously early into growth, but nothing can be done about it.

  3. Amy Olmsted
    Amy Olmsted says:

    I just uncovered all the trays of potted plants and there was a whole flat of Corydalis all budded up as well as a potfull of a nice pale yellow Aconite. I just love this time of year!!

    • diversifolius
      diversifolius says:

      Yes, it is nice to see everything coming into buds. If only wouldn’t have to worry for the low temperatures and late snowfalls.

    • diversifolius
      diversifolius says:

      Yes, even with setbacks of cold/snow intervals it is a most lovely time of year! This ‘bursting’ is even more pronounced here; usually we jump from the first to the third gear at once :)

Comments are closed.